Health News (Reuters)

J&J kept a guiding hand on talc safety research

Johnson & Johnson developed a strategy in the 1970s to deal with a growing volume of research showing that talc miners had elevated rates of lung disease and cancer: Promote the positive, challenge the negative.

J&J shares nosedive on report it knew of asbestos in Baby Powder

Shares of Johnson & Johnson fell 10 percent on Friday and were on track to post their biggest percentage drop in more than 16 years, after Reuters reported that the pharma major knew for decades that cancer-causing asbestos lurked in its Baby Powder.

Worth the sting: Cuba's scorpion pain remedy

Once a month for the last decade, Pepe Casanas, a 78-year-old Cuban farmer, has hunted down a scorpion to sting himself with, vowing that the venom wards off his rheumatism pains.

Doctors struggle to help older gun owners

(Reuters Health) - Doctors who work with seniors are grappling with ways to prevent gun-related suicides and accidents, often among gun-owning older patients with dementia or depression, according to a recent review article.

U.S. appeals court narrows order on Trump birth control rules

A federal appeals court on Thursday narrowed an order that had blocked President Donald Trump's administration from enforcing new rules that undermine an Obamacare requirement for employers to provide insurance that covers women's birth control.

Inflammatory bowel disease tied to heart attack risk

(Reuters Health) - - People with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis may be up to 12 times more likely to have a heart attack, a U.S. study suggests.

Sleep problems may be worse when menopause is hastened by surgery

(Reuters Health) - - Women who have surgery to remove their ovaries go through menopause abruptly, and a new study suggests this comes with an increased risk for the kinds of sleep troubles many women experience when they go through menopause gradually.

Crosswords and sudoku may not stop mental decline

(Reuters Health) - - Mental engagement through problem-solving games like crossword puzzles, sudoku and brain teasers may not offset cognitive losses due to age-related dementia, a new study suggests.

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