Health News (Reuters)

Merck, Pfizer combo treatment boosts kidney cancer survival

Drugmaker Merck & Co Inc said on Monday that the combination of its cancer immunotherapy Keytruda with Pfizer Inc's Inlyta cut the risk of death nearly in half for patients with the most common form of kidney cancer when compared with treatment with chemotherapy drug Sutent.

One in six U.S. kids have mental health disorders

(Reuters Health) - Roughly in six U.S. kids have at least one mental health disorder, and only about half of them receive treatment from a mental health professional, a new study suggests.

Gilead misses key goal in NASH liver disease trial, shares sink

Gilead Sciences Inc said on Monday that a late-stage study of a key experimental drug aimed at treating NASH, a progressive fatty liver disease, failed to meet its main goal, sending the company's shares down 4.6 percent in after-hours trading.

FDA rebukes 17 firms for selling fake Alzheimer's drugs

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned more than a dozen companies against selling unapproved products which claim to treat Alzheimer's disease and other serious ailments, the agency said on Monday.

Sanofi and Regeneron cut list price of cholesterol drug by 60 percent

Sanofi SA and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc said on Monday that they will slash the U.S. list price of their potent but expensive cholesterol fighter Praluent by 60 percent, as the drugmakers follow a similar move by rival Amgen Inc in hopes of increasing use of the drug.

Seven mumps cases confirmed at Houston ICE detention facility

Seven adult detainees at a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facility in Houston have been diagnosed with mumps, but the contagious disease is contained, the city's health department said on Saturday.

Optimism may protect against chronic pain in soldiers

(Reuters Health) - Soldiers who displayed high optimism before deployment were less likely to develop chronic pain after being sent to Afghanistan or Iraq than those who were more pessimistic, a new study finds.

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