Health News (Reuters)

Europe recalls generic heart drug made in China on cancer fears

LONDON (Reuters) - A number of high blood pressure and heart drugs containing an ingredient made in China are being recalled across Europe after an impurity that may cause cancer was found in them, officials said on Thursday.

Secondhand smoking tied to snoring in kids

(Reuters Health) - Exposing children to secondhand tobacco smoke increases their risk of developing habitual snoring, according to an analysis of existing research.

Secondhand smoking tied to snoring in kids

(Reuters Health) - Exposing children to secondhand tobacco smoke increases their risk of developing habitual snoring, according to an analysis of existing research.

Timeline: Britain's National Health Service turns 70

Britain marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the National Health Service on Thursday, a moment of pride and concern for a country that has nurtured its growth into the largest publicly funded healthcare service in the world.

Timeline: Britain's National Health Service turns 70

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the National Health Service on Thursday, a moment of pride and concern for a country that has nurtured its growth into the largest publicly funded healthcare service in the world.

South Africans paying too much for private healthcare: watchdog

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africans are paying too much for private healthcare, the country's antitrust watchdog said on Thursday, adding patients are sometimes prescribed treatments they don't need by an industry with limited competition.

'Safety net' clinics uneven in delivery of help to quit smoking

(Reuters Health) - Health clinics where low-income people in the U.S. obtain medical care don't always offer help with quitting smoking - and availability of that assistance may vary by patients' ethnicity and insurance, a recent study suggests.

'Safety net' clinics uneven in delivery of help to quit smoking

(Reuters Health) - Health clinics where low-income people in the U.S. obtain medical care don't always offer help with quitting smoking - and availability of that assistance may vary by patients' ethnicity and insurance, a recent study suggests.

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